Become a Preceptor

Impact lives and enhance the Nursing@USC experience by becoming a preceptor. Our online Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program is actively seeking preceptors for clinical rotations in the following health care settings:

  • Adult primary care offices
  • Clinics
  • Community health centers
  • Family practice offices (with 50 percent of provider panels in pediatrics)
  • Internal medicine offices (with at least 30 percent of visits related to wellness)
  • Pediatric care offices
  • Urgent care clinics

Nursing@USC’s preceptor needs vary by clinical rotation and include nurse practitioners (family nurse practitioners, women’s health nurse practitioners, adult gerontology nurse practitioners and pediatric nurse practitioners), physicians (MDs and DOs), and physician assistants. Preceptors directly supervise students as they complete a total of 196 clinical hours — at least 14 hours per week. Preceptors and Nursing@USC students negotiate the days and times these supervised hours are completed.

For a breakdown of the program’s preceptor needs by clinical rotation and the number of hours committed, refer to the charts below.

Rotation 1: Adult Patients

HOURSWEEKLY HOURSPREFERRED FOCUSCLINICAL SETTING OPTIONSPRECEPTOR TYPE
19614Adult WellnessAdult primary care office/clinic (preferred)

Internal medicine office/clinic (if the provider sees at least 30 percent wellness visits)

Family practice office or clinic (adults only — no pediatrics or OB). The preference is for students not to be placed in a site with pediatrics for their first rotation. If the student must be placed in a family practice site, then no more than 20 percent of the provider panel can be pediatrics.

Community Health Center
NP (ANP, FNP, GNP), MD, DO, PA

Rotation 2: Childbearing and Childrearing

HOURSWEEKLY HOURSPREFERRED FOCUSCLINICAL SETTING OPTIONSPRECEPTOR TYPE
19614Adult primary care/women’s health/geriatricsAdult primary care office/clinic

Internal medicine office/clinic

Family practice office/clinic (only if no more than 20 percent of provider panel is pediatrics)

CareMore Care Centers

Community health center

Urgent care (no retail or retail pharmacy clinics)

Note: If a student completes Rotation 3 in an urgent care setting, they may not be placed in an urgent care setting for their final rotation.
NP (ANP, FNP, GNP), MD, DO, PA

Rotation 3: Adult Patients With Complex Issues

HOURSWEEKLY HOURSPREFERRED FOCUSCLINICAL SETTING OPTIONSPRECEPTOR TYPE
19614Adult primary care/women’s health/geriatricsAdult primary care office/clinic

Internal medicine office/clinic

Family practice office/clinic (only if no more than 20 percent of provider panel is pediatrics)

CareMore Care Centers

Community health center

Urgent care (no retail or retail pharmacy clinics)

Note: If a student completes Rotation 3 in an urgent care setting, they may not be placed in an urgent care setting for their final rotation.
NP (ANP, FNP, GNP), MD, DO, PA

Rotation 4: Family Primary Care

HOURSWEEKLY HOURSPREFERRED FOCUSCLINICAL SETTING OPTIONSPRECEPTOR TYPE
19614Family practice adult/women’s health/geriatricsFamily practice office/clinic (preferred)

Adult primary care clinic

Community health center

CareMore Care Centers

Pediatric care office/clinic (if needed)

WHNP is an acceptable option for this rotation only if a student has a specific interest in a women’s health rotation.

Note: If a student was placed in urgent care for Rotation 3, they may not be placed in urgent care again.
NP (ANP, FNP, GNP, and WHNP; PNP only if student needs pediatrics), MD, PA, DO

Preceptor-Student-Clinical Faculty Learning Agreement

Why Become a Preceptor?

Benefits

The benefits of becoming a preceptor are manifold, including the opportunity to mentor the next generation of nursing professionals and to continue making connections in the growing heath care community.

Preceptors also may be eligible to receive free access to USC library resources, which include clinical decision support systems, applications, textbooks, databases, journals, full-text articles and more. Additionally, opportunities for research and scholarship collaborations may be available to preceptors.

Featured Preceptor

Donna Cashdan, D.O. F.A.A.F.P
Sherman Oaks Family Medicine, Inc.

Prior to starting Sherman Oaks Family Medicine, Inc. eleven years ago, Dr. Cashdan practiced medicine at a residency program in Glendale, CA, where she frequently taught medical students.

After launching her own practice, Dr. Cashdan realized she missed teaching students and decided to use her office to treat patients and educate physician assistant and nurse practitioner students.

Dr. Cashdan’s site is bustling with a diverse patient mix. Nursing@USC students get hands on training under her guidance and learn the ins and outs of running a health care business.

Dr. Cashdan trains her students on how to utilize electronic health records effectively and efficiently and how to best manage their time with patients. In addition, Dr. Cashdan’s student learn how to treat patients of all ages and address urgent care matters and well visits.

Being a preceptor is a time commitment, but according to Dr. Cashdan, it is worth the experience.

“It’s so important for health care facilities to have nurse practitioners in practice. They have an extensive knowledge base and are great with patients,” said Dr. Cashdan. “I like USC. I am really impressed with the students and their level of education.”

Become a Preceptor

If you are interested in becoming a preceptor or learning more about the benefits of this unique opportunity, email Sharon O’Neill at sponeill@usc.edu.